Junior College and NAIA Recruiting Rules

NJCAA & NAIA Contact Rules

Athletic Recruiting contact rules for NJCAA and NAIA Schools

The National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) are much different organizations than the NCAA and operate with much different (less) rules than the NCAA

Junior College Contact Rules

At the national level, the NJCAA sets the basic outline of what is allowed and not allowed, but those rules are the lowest common denominator for any Junior College. All 500 + JC’s are subdivided by 24 regions around the country. For example, Region One is made up of all schools from the Arizona Community College Athletic Association and Region Three is a group of schools in Upstate NY.

Each region is free to make up its own set of rules, never lower in criteria to the NCJAA of course. The basic NJCAC rules are summaries and avoid the minute detail found in the NCAA rulebook, most likely leading the strict interpretation to each region. The best bet is to call the school of interest and ask the coach you are speaking with. To our knowledge, the NJCAA doesn’t list any contact rules on their website with regards to high school athletes. To see additional rules, please check out the NJCAA guide for high school athletes

NAIA Contact Rules

NAIA schools have less stringent recruiting and contact rules and can contact a high school athlete of any age at any time much like an NCAA D3 coach. There are no quiet periods or dead periods to adhere to. Pretty basic! They believe more frequent communication between college coach and recruit will foster a better relationship and allow both coach and recruit to make their choices easier. What a novel concept! To see additional rules, please check out the NAIA guide for high school athletes

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What are the NCAA Contact Rules

NCAA Contact Rules

Learn some basic NCAA contact rules that college coaches must follow

The NCAA has a dizzying array of contact rules for different sports and different divisions. Most of the rules in place are designed for coaches and not recruits. Meaning, you can’t really get in trouble with regards to the contact rules. The onus is on them to know and follow the rules set forth by the NCAA

We have covered some basic contact rules below and have provided a link for the free download of the NCAA Guide

The day you start class as a 9th grader is the day you officially become a Prospective Student Athlete (PSA). The NCAA defines “Recruiting” as “any solicitation of a prospect (or your patents or guardian) by a school or a rep of the school” (someone who acts in the schools interest) for the purpose of ultimately getting you enrolled at the school and participating in athletics.

Being recruited means that eventually coaches will be contacting you via phone, mail, and in-person visits to discuss you playing for their school. To level the playing field for schools large and small (and to protect recruits), the NCAA has strict rules governing recruiting and the contacts a coach can have with potential recruits.

The NCAA rulebook is 4 inches thick. Generally speaking, following some basic rules will keep you out of trouble. However, you do need to understand some specifics…

Telephone Calls

Please note, these dates were updated on 11/6/2019 per the NCAA Guide for the College Bound Student-Athlete produced by the NCAA

In all sports other sports, phone calls from faculty members and coaches can take place on or after the following dates.

NCAA D1 – College coaches can begin to call beginning June 15th between your sophomore and junior year in high school.
NCAA D2 – College coaches can begin to call you beginning June 15th between your sophomore and junior year in high school.
NCAA D3 – Unlike D1 and D2, there are no restrictions as to when a D3 coach can call a prospect in high school. The NCAA feels that smaller D3 schools do not have the time, money, or resources to abuse this privilege, which will often be true.

Football Specific: In Division I & IAA , a coach may call you or your family beginning July 1st between your sophomore and junior year in high school.

Men’s Basketball Division I: College coaches can begin to call you beginning June 15th between your sophomore and junior year in high school.

Women’s Basketball Division I: College coaches can begin to call you beginning September 1st of your junior year in high school.

Men’s Ice Hockey Division I – College coaches may begin calling on January 1st of your sophomore year.

Lacrosse and Softball Division I – College coaches can begin to call you beginning September 1st of your junior year in high school.

Baseball Division I: College coaches can begin to call you beginning September 1st of your junior year in high school.

Text Messaging
Text messaging is something we all love (well maybe not everyone) and was being used very prevalently by college coaches a few years ago. But like all good things, there were problems. Text messaging got out of control and recruits began to receive hundreds of text messages a week from college coaches, along with a huge phone bill if they didn’t have an unlimited text messaging plan. It was only a matter of time before the NCAA stepped in. In 2007 the NCAA banned text messaging from college coaches to recruits. Many coaches said they hated text messaging but had to do it because every other coach was doing it. But technology always wins out and texting and instant messaging is now allowed again under the following parameters.

DIVISION 1

Men’s basketball: Electronic correspondence can begin June 15th after sophomore year.

Women’s basketball: Electronic correspondence can begin September 1st of junior year.

Football: Electronic correspondence can begin September 1st of junior year.

Men’s Ice Hockey: Electronic correspondence can begin January 1st of sophomore year

Lacrosse & Softball: Electronic correspondence can begin September 1st of junior year.

Baseball: Electronic correspondence can begin September 1st of junior year.

All Other sports: Electronic correspondence can begin June 15th between your sophomore and junior year in high school.

Swimminng & Diving, Cross Country, Track & Field: Only email and faxes allowed until you provide a written commitment to the NCAA school

DIVISION 2 & 3

D2: Texting is allowed at the D2 level on/after June 15th of a prospects sophomore year.

D3: Texting at the D3 level is not regulated by date or frequency.

Mail Call
The NCAA once again has a wide array of rules for mailings at the D1 level for different sports. For a complete list, please see the NCAA guide for the College Bound Student-Athlete.

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NCAA Home Schooling

NCAA Home Schooling Eligibility

How does the NCAA certify high school athletes that were home schooled.

Source: NCAA.org

Home School Students

Learning at home is not necessarily the same as being home schooled. Because of recent growth in online and virtual education, a student may be able to learn at home through an online school with online teachers, which would not be considered a parent-directed home school. Courses that will be evaluated as home school courses are those in which a parent or tutor:

Plans and delivers actual instructional activities such as lectures, discussions, tutorials, feedback or assistance.

Determines the student’s comprehension of the material by grading and evaluating student performance and achievement on assignments and assessments and providing appropriate re-teaching and feedback.

Determines the overall grade the student achieved in the course.

Places the grade on a transcript or grade report or reports the grade to a transcription agency.

How to Register

If you are a home school student and want to play NCAA sports at a Division I or II school, you need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center and meet the same standards as all other students.

Once you have completed your registration, you will want to go to the Resources tab at eligibilitycenter.org and visit the Home School Students section for a home school checklist, transcript example, and core-course worksheet.

Where to Send Your Home School Documents

All documents must be submitted to the following address: NCAA Eligibility Center (ATTN: Home School Evaluation) 1802 Alonzo Watford Sr. Drive Indianapolis, IN 46202-6222

Additional Info. On NCAA.org

See changes to the Eligibility Center Registration process

What is National Letter of Intent

What is The National Letter of Intent?

What is the National Letter of Intent and how does it affect high school athletes?

For many high school students, the National Letter of Intent may be one of the first legal documents you sign along with some tax forms or your application for your drivers license. It comes with both excitement that you have accepted and received an athletic scholarship to an NCAA D1 or NCAA D2 college, as well as some serious consequences if you do not fulfill your end of the agreement. Before you sign an NLI, you need to understand the requirements of it and be sure of the school choice you are making…

Please note: Prior to signing a National Letter of Intent, you should receive something informally called an offer letter. The “offer letter” is a signed document from the coach/athletic department/school that signifies that you are formally being offered an athletic scholarship. The letter will signify exactly what is being offered either a full scholarship or a partial scholarship. Per NCAA rules, the letter will also include information that says in order to maintain this offer you need to: complete the academic requirements of your senior year, meet all NCAA eligibility requirements, meet admissions requirements at the school making the offer, and continue to be a model student and athlete (translation, don’t get arrested or in trouble with the law).

Web site: National Letter of Intent

Overview: What is the NLI?

The National Letter of Intent Program is run by the Collegiate Commissioners Association (CCA). The NLI program started in 1964 with seven conferences and eight independent institutions, the program now has over 650 Division 1 and Division 2 participating institutions.

The NLI program calls for a prospective student-athlete to sign, along with a parent or legal guardian and the athletic director, an “Inter-Conference Letter of Intent” on a specific date. This letter served as certification that the student intended to enroll at a certain institution in the fall. The athletic director indicated the type and extent of financial aid the institution was willing to provide. Other cooperating conferences and institutions would then respect his/her decision and not attempt to recruit him/her further. This agreement was subject to the prospective student qualifying for admission to the institution of his/her choice and the NCAA requirement for financial aid.

What are the National Letter of Intent (NLI) Signing Dates?

The following are the signing dates for the NLI: Please note, these change slightly every year!

Do not sign prior to 7:00 a.m. (local time) on the following
dates or after the final signing date listed for each sport.

2018- 2019 Signing dates

 

Sport (s) Initial Signing Date Final Signing Date
Division I Basketball (Early Period) November 13, 2019 November 20, 2019
Division I Basketball (Regular Period) April 15 2020 May 20, 2020
Division I Football (Early Period) December 18, 2019 December 20, 2020
Division I and II Football (Midyear JC Transfer) December 18, 2019 January 15, 2020
Division I and II Football (Regular Period) February 5, 2020 Division I: April 1, 2020
Division II: August 1, 2020
All Other Division I and II Sports November 13, 2019 August 1, 2020

Common Questions regarding the National Letter of Intent

When I sign a National Letter of Intent what do I agree to do? 
When you sign the National Letter of Intent you agree to attend the institution with which you signed for one academic year in exchange for the institution awarding financial aid, including athletics aid, for one academic year.

By signing a National Letter of Intent am I guaranteed that I will play on the squad? 
No. Signing a National Letter of Intent does not guarantee you playing time or a spot on the team. Rather, by signing a National Letter of Intent, the institution with which you sign agrees to provide you athletics financial aid for the academic year.

How do I satisfy the National Letter of Intent? 
You can satisfy the National Letter of Intent one of two ways. You satisfy the National Letter of Intent by attending the institution with which you sign for at least one academic year or by graduating from a junior college if you signed a National Letter of Intent while in high school or during your first year at the junior college.

If I complete the playing season at the institution with which I sign, have I satisfied the National Letter of Intent? 
No. Completing a playing season alone does not satisfy the National Letter of Intent. You must complete the academic year in residence.

Do I sign a National Letter of Intent every year? 
No

Once I sign a National Letter of Intent may I be recruited by other institutions? 
Once you sign a National Letter of Intent, all other participating conferences and institutions are obligated to cease recruiting you. Accordingly, you have an obligation to notify any recruiter from a National Letter of Intent institution of the fact you have signed a National Letter of Intent.

Am I required to sign a National Letter of Intent? 
No. You are not required to sign a National Letter of Intent. Once you sign a National Letter of Intent, a recruiting ban goes into effect and you can no longer be recruited by any other National Letter of Intent school which leaves you free to enjoy your final year at your current institution.

If I sign with an NCAA Division I institution can I still sign with a Division II institution? 
The true issue is not whether a school is a Division I or Division II institution but whether an institution is a member of the National Letter of Intent Program. With over 500 participating institutions the NLI program is truly national in scope. Briefly, all of Division I institutions, with the exception of the Service Academies and the Ivy League, are members of the program and a large number of Division II institutions participate in the program. No Division III institutions, NAIA schools, preparatory schools or junior colleges participate in the National Letter of Intent Program.

Who signs a National Letter of Intent? 
Generally, only prospective student-athletes who are enrolling in a four-year institution for the first time sign a National Letter of Intent. Student-athletes who start their academic career at a four-year institution and then transfer to a junior college may also sign a National Letter of Intent if they plan on entering a second four-year institution.

If I sign a National Letter of Intent in one sport may I sign a National Letter of Intent in a different sport? 
No. You may only sign one valid National Letter of Intent annually. Furthermore, when you sign a National Letter of Intent you sign with an institution and not with a coach or with a specific sports team.
Is a National Letter of Intent considered valid if I submit it to the institution via facsimile? 
Yes. When you sign the National Letter of Intent you enter into an agreement with the institution. Faxing only represents the means by which you transmit the National Letter. Accordingly, a National Letter of Intent transmitted by facsimile is considered valid. As a matter of practice, it is suggested that you also return the hard copy of the document to the signing institution even if you have already sent the document via fax.

If I do not live with a parent or legal guardian, is it necessary that a parent or legal guardian sign the National Letter of Intent? 
If you are under the age of 21, your parent or legal guardian must sign the National Letter of Intent in order for it to be considered valid. If you are 21 years of age or older, it is not necessary for your parent or legal guardian to sign the document.

If my parent or legal guardian lives at a different location than I do, is it permissible to sign a letter sent by facsimile? 
While it is not ideal, yes it is permissible to sign a letter sent by facsimile. From a procedural stand point, you should make three copies of the fax and sign the document in triplicate. Once signed, you should retain a copy for your records and return the other two copies to the institution. When the institution receives the copies, they will retain a copy and forward a copy to their conference office for filing.

Can a coach be present when I sign the National Letter of Intent off-campus? 
No. A coach cannot be present when you sign a National Letter of Intent off-campus.

Is it permissible to receive a National Letter of Intent while on campus for an official visit? 
Yes. While under the terms of the National Letter of Intent program a coach or institutional representative may not hand-deliver a National Letter of Intent off-campus, there is nothing that precludes you from receiving a National Letter of Intent while you are on campus for an official visit. Please remember that you can only sign a National Letter of Intent during a permissible signing period.

If I am going to walk-on to the team, may I sign a National Letter of Intent? 
No. Under the terms of the National Letter of Intent Program, an institution is strictly prohibited from allowing you to sign a National Letter of Intent if you are a walk-on. In order for a National Letter of Intent it be consider valid, the National Letter of Intent must be accompanied by an athletic award letter which lists the terms and conditions of the award, including the amount and duration of the financial aid. Simply put, there has to be an award including athletics aid for there to be a valid National Letter of Intent.

May I sign a National Letter of Intent before I am certified as eligible by the NCAA Clearinghouse? 
Yes. You may sign a National Letter of Intent before you receive your final certification determination from the Clearinghouse.

Where is my signed National Letter of Intent filed? Who is responsible for filing the document? 
You should sign your National Letter of Intent in triplicate. Once signed, you should retain a copy for your records and you should send the two other executed documents to the signing institution. When the institution receives your letters, the will keep one copy and forward one copy to their conference office. The institution must file your NLI with the conference office within 21 days after the date of final signature or else the letter will be considered invalid. Once the conference office receives your information they will notify the National Letter of Intent office via mail or computer of the fact you have signed a National Letter of Intent.

Is a National Letter of Intent binding if the coach that signed me leaves the institution to take another position?
Yes. The National Letter of Intent you signed with an institution is valid if the coach that recruited you leaves the institution with which you signed. When you sign a National Letter of Intent you sign with an institution and not with a coach or a specific team.

Do I sign a National Letter of Intent if I transfer to another four-year institution? 
No. A student-athlete transferring from one four-year institution to another does not sign another National Letter of Intent.

What happens if I change my mind and I do not want to attend the institution with which I sign and want to attend another National Letter of Intent institution? 
If you do not attend the institution with which you signed or if you do not satisfy the terms of the National Letter of Intent Program, the basic penalty is you lose two years of eligibility at the next National Letter of Intent institution and you must sit two years in residence at that school.

Can the Basic Penalty which calls for a loss of two years of eligibility and requires that I sit two years in residence at the next National Letter of Intent Institution be reduced? 
Yes. The Basic Penalty under the National Letter of Intent agreement can be reduced by entering into a Release Request Form with the signing institution. By entering into a Release Request Form, the institution and the student-athlete mutually agree to release each other from any commitment and liability to each other as a result of signing a National Letter of Intent. Pursuant to the Release Request Form, you may not represent a second National Letter of Intent institution in any sport during the first year of residence there and you will be charged with a loss of one season of competition in all sports.

Does the institution with which I signed have to grant me a Release Request Form if requested? 
No. Just as the National Letter of Intent is a voluntary agreement, the Release Request Form is voluntary in nature. An institution is not required to provide you with a Release Request Form. If an institution denies your request for a Release Request Form, you may petition the National Letter of Intent Steering Committee for such an agreement.

If I do not satisfy my National Letter of Intent agreement, may I practice or receive athletics aid at another National Letter of Intent institution? 
Yes. Signing a National Letter of Intent does not impact your ability to practice or receive athletics aid at another National Letter of Intent institution. The Basic Penalty under the National Letter of Intent program is that you lose two years of eligibility in all sports and have to sit two years in residence at the next National Letter of Intent institution.

If I fail to honor my NLI commitment and do not attend the institution with which I signed, may another NLI member institution recruit me? 
Yes, if you have received a Release Request Form from the institution with which you signed, or the institution that desires to recruit you is granted permission to do so by the institution with which you signed. (If permission to contact is granted, it is not limited to certain institutions, but to all institutions seeking to recruit the student-athlete.)

Can the institution with which I signed grant me a full and complete release from my NLI? 
No. The extent of relief that an institution can provide a student-athlete who signs a NLI but, for whatever reason, fails to honor the terms and conditions of the agreement is a Release Request Form. Student-athletes must appeal the terms and conditions of the Release Request Form to the NLI Steering Committee. However, if a student-athlete meets the conditions of the one-year absence provision (NLI Provision No. 7-c), the institution’s athletics director may write a letter stating that athletically related aid will not be available for the subsequent fall term and allow the student-athlete to pursue other options without NLI repercussions. (See NLI Provision 7-c.)

If my request for a Release Request Form is denied, is the institution obligated to provide me an opportunity for a hearing as to why the request was denied? 
No.

May a mid year enrollee sign a National Letter of Intent? 
Under the terms of the National Letter of Intent Program a written award of athletics aid for the entire academic year must accompany a National Letter of Intent. Accordingly, the National Letter of Intent program does not allow for prospective student-athletes enrolling at midyear to sign a National Letter of Intent. The National Letter of Intent Program has created an exception to this general rule for midyear junior college transfer students in the sport of football. A midyear junior college transfer student in the sport of football may sign a National Letter of Intent during the designated signing period.

If I sign a letter of intent with a junior college or an NAIA school may I sign a National Letter of Intent? 
Yes. You may sign a National Letter of Intent if you have already signed a letter of intent with a junior college or an NAIA school.

If I sign a National Letter of Intent may I attend an NAIA school or a school that does not participate in the NLI program without incurring any National Letter of Intent penalties? 
If you sign a National Letter of Intent, you may attend any institution that does not belong to the National Letter of Intent Program without incurring any National Letter of Intent penalties while at the non participating school. Please note though, that if you ever transfer to an institution that did participate in the National Letter of Intent Program, the National Letter of Intent penalties would be applied at the next National Letter of Intent institution.

If I call the NCAA can I get more information about the National Letter of Intent? 
No. The National Letter of Intent program is not administered by the NCAA. Rather, the National Letter of Intent Program is administered by the Collegiate Commissioners Association (CCA).

If you have additional questions about the National Letter of Intent please contact your institution’s conference office or the National Letter of Intent Program. If you have a question about NCAA eligibility, transfer regulations or recruiting you may contact the NCAA at (317) 917-6222.

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NCAA Eligibility Requirements

What are the requirements to play college sports?

What GPA and SAT/ACT scores do I need to play college sports?

NCAA Eligibility Requirements

DIVISION 1 REQUIREMENTS

If You Enroll AFTER August 1, 2016 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  1. Complete 16 NCAA core courses: • Four years of English; • Three years of math (Algebra 1 or higher); • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it); • Two years of social science; • One additional year of English, math or natural/ physical science; and • Four additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.
  2. Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses for GPA improvement.
  3. Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in your core courses.
  4. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding Scale.

What If I Don’t Meet the Division 1 Standards?

If you enroll full time at a Division I school after August 1, 2016, and you have not met all the Division I academic standards, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt, you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year. The academic redshirt qualification is only for students who enroll full time in college after August 1, 2016. To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic standards: 1. Complete 16 core courses; 2. Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses; and 3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale

DIVISION 2 REQUIREMENTS

If You Enroll BEFORE August 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

  1. Complete 16 core courses: • Three years of English; • Two years of math (Algebra 1 or higher); • Two years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it); • Two years of social science; • Three additional years of English, math or natural or physical science; and • Four additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.
  2. Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses.
  3. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.

What If I Don’t Meet the Division 2 Standards?

If You Enroll BEFORE August 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school before August 1, 2018, and you have not met all the Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ONE of the following standards:

  1. Earn a 2.0 GPA in 16 core courses; or
  2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.

DIVISION 3 REQUIREMENTS

There is good news and bad news at the NCAA Division 3 level. The good news is the Eligibility Center does not certify athletes to play at the NCAA D3 level. In fact, there are no academic standards you need to meet to be eligible to play D3 athletics. The bad news is that many D3 colleges are small private colleges with far higher academic standards for admission than the NCAA requires for eligibility at the D1 or D2 level.

How do I know the core classes I am taking at my high school will satisfy NCAA eligibility?

This is where your guidance counselor earns their money. They should know what classes qualify and if they or you are unsure you can research your high school’s classes on the NCAA website NCAA Core Course Requirements

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NCAA Eligibility Center

NCAA Eligibility Center

What is the registration process for high school athletes with the NCAA Eligibility Center

PLEASE NOTE:

The NCAA Eligibility Center has recently updated how they enroll high school athletes. In the past, all athletes had to pay a fee to enroll. the Eligibility Center now has what is called a certification account (paid) and a profile Account (free) that high school athletes can choose from. Learn more about the NCAA Eligibility Center Changes

The NCAA Eligibility Center (formerly called the NCAA Clearinghouse) is the organization that handles ALL inquiries regarding an individual’s initial eligibility status to play NCAA D1 and D2 athletics. The Eligibility Center maintains and processes all eligibility certifications. Their web address is: www.eligibilitycenter.org

If you have any aspiration of playing college athletics (regardless of your grades or SAT/ACT scores) you must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center by the end of your junior year. NO EXCEPTIONS!

NCAA Eligibility Center Registration Process

In order to register you must complete the online registration process found at www.eligibilitycenter.org

Visitors to the web site will also find a useful tool to find a list of approved high school courses that can fulfill your eligibility requirements.

New Toll Free Numbers
Customer Service Line – 877-262-1492 (domestic callers only):

Mailing Address
NCAA Eligibility Center
Certification Processing
PO Box 7136
Indianapolis, IN 46207

Just who is the NCAA Eligibility Center

The NCAA Eligibility Center, located in Indianapolis Indiana, is the organization that handles ALL inquiries regarding an individual’s initial eligibility status. The eligibility center processes all of the initial-eligibility certifications for all high school athletes interested in playing NCAA D1 and NCAA D2 athletes.

When should I register with the Eligibility Center?

After your junior year of high school. You can register online by creating an account.

What records does the clearinghouse require?
High school athletes need to provide the Eligibility Center their transcript after they have completed 6 semesters of high school (or after your junior year). You must also have your SAT or ACT scores reported directly from the testing company to the Eligibility Center which can be accomplished when you register for the SAT or ACT.

Is there a deadline for registering?
NO

Is there a fee for the NCAA Eligibility Center?

Yes – $90 for US residents (includes Canada, American Samoa, Guam, Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and US Virgin Islands), $135 for International students. Note: Please see our updated article on recent Eligibility Center registration changes

Can the fee be waved?

Students who received a waiver for the SAT or ACT fees are eligible for a waiver of the clearinghouse registration fee. Your guidance counselor can submit confirmation of the student’s test fee waiver to the Eligibility Center.

Does registering help me gain admission to college?

NO, it has no bearing on individual acceptances to colleges. It only tells college coaches and colleges that you are an eligible athlete that qualifies to participate in athletics at the NCAA D1 or D2 level.

What else do I need?

A valid email address

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Who is the NCAA

Who is the NCAA

Learn about the different divisions at the NCAA Level

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a voluntary association of  1,121 colleges and universities devoted to the sound administration of intercollegiate athletics.

NCAA Division I

From NCAA.org:

Among the three NCAA divisions, Division I schools generally have the biggest student bodies, manage the largest athletics budgets and offer the most generous number of scholarships. Schools who are members of Division I commit to maintaining a high academic standard for student-athletes in addition to a wide range of opportunities for athletics participation.

With nearly 350 colleges and universities in its membership, Division I schools field more than 6,000 athletic teams, providing opportunities for more than 170,000 student-athletes to compete in NCAA sports each year.

Division I is subdivided based on football sponsorship. Schools that participate in bowl games belong to the Football Bowl Subdivision. Those that participate in the NCAA-run football championship belong to the Football Championship Subdivision. A third group doesn’t sponsor football at all. The subdivisions apply only to football; all other sports are considered simply Division I.

NCAA Division II

From NCAA.org:

Division II is a collection of 312 colleges and universities that provide thousands of student-athletes the opportunity to compete at a high level of scholarship athletics while excelling in the classroom and fully engaging in the broader campus experience. This balance, in which student-athletes are recognized for their academic success, athletics contributions, and campus and community involvement, is at the heart of the Division II philosophy.

The Division II approach provides growth opportunities through academic achievement, learning in high-level athletics competition and a focus on service to the community. The balance and integration of these different areas of learning provide Division II student-athletes with a path to graduation while cultivating a variety of skills and knowledge for life after college.

NCAA Division III

From NCAA.org:

More than 170,000 student-athletes at 442 institutions make up Division III, the largest NCAA division both in number of participants and number of schools. The Division III experience offers participation in a competitive athletic environment that pushes student-athletes to excel on the field and build upon their potential by tackling new challenges across campus.

Academics are the primary focus for Division III student-athletes. The division minimizes the conflicts between athletics and academics and helps student-athletes progress toward graduation through shorter practice and playing seasons and regional competition that reduces time away from academic studies. Participants are integrated on campus and treated like all other members of the student body, keeping them focused on being a student first.

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NCAA Rules and Regulations

NCAA Rules & Regulations

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 colleges and universities, athletic conferences and sports organizations devoted to the sound administration of intercollegiate athletics. In years past, the NCAA rule book was thicker than they yellow pages. It was said that when college coaches were administered tests on rules it was an open book test and some still couldn’t pass. The NCAA wields great power and there are some rules and regulations you need to follow and be aware of to succeed in the college athletic recruiting process

WHO IS THE NCAA?

Many people have heard of the NCAA. Learn more about the organizations and it’s members. Who is the NCAA

NCAA ELIGIBILITY CENTER

The NCAA Eligibility Center (Formerly called Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse) is the first step you must take to fulfill your goal of becoming an NCAA athlete. NCAA Eligibility Center

How is NCAA Eligibility Determined?

What does it take to be eligible to to play college athletics at the NCAA D1 or NCAA D2 level? NCAA Eligibility

What are the NCAA contact rules?

The NCAA has a dizzying array of contact rules for different sports and different divisions. NCAA Contact Rules

What is the National Letter of Intent

The National Letter of Intent is perhaps the first or second legal document you will ever sign. What is the National Letter of Intent

NJCAA & NAIA CONTACT RULES

the NCAA isn’t the only game in town. There are hundreds Junior Colleges and NAIA Colleges that offer both athletics and athletic scholarships. NJCAA and NAIA Contact Rules

HOME SCHOOLING

Many parents are resorting to home schooling. NCAA Rules on Home Schooling

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